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if you look at what has been happening in russia over the past several years. we have an authoritarian regime. the orthodox church has a lot of influence. it was clear there would be repercussions. >> they were treated like hardened criminals. they were charged with hooliganism, motivated by religious hatred. each was sentenced to two years in prison camp. they became icons for the anti- putin protest movement. katya change lawyers and was released on a suspended sentence. that is something she puts down to international pressure. >> what happened to us was not in vain. we attracted the attention of people all over the world, showing them how bad things are in russia regarding artistic freedom, the legal system, and human rights. katya has watched this internet video over and over. she says she is in touch with her friends in the camp and knows how much tougher things are for them. >> i read the metro. i do not hide. to date, i've never been attacked by radicals. most of the people that lead on that they recognize me show a positive reaction towards me. >> her former lawyers say she co
the story may face prison. and as russia remembers the battle of stalingrad, what does it say about the country's tanzania." mlk >> president francois hollande says french troops will only withdraw from mali when african forces can replace them. hollande visited timbuktu on saturday. egypt's interior ministry has condemned the beating of a protestor in cairo. one person was killed during violent demonstrations on friday outside the presidential palace. syrian government tanks have been blown up by roadside bombs in the capital, damascus. there have been violent clashes between government and rebel forces in karnak. in india, the man accused of a gang rape of a fizz therapist student entered a nonguilty plea. the court case in new delhi has been fast tracked. the victim was beaten, raped and thrown from a bus. she died two weeks later. on friday, india's cabinet approved harsher punishments for rapists. including the death penalty. members of paramilitary force have been arrested on suspicion of molesting a group of girls on a train. a somali woman who accused government soldiers of
jane o'brien. a need your explodes over russia, leaving at least 1000 people injured and surprising many more. >> there was a flash. we thought it was fireworks. and then there was an explosion a couple minutes later. >> prosecutors say they will pursue premeditated murder charges in the shooting death of pistorius' girlfriend, and we will show you why the big easy is becoming hollywood of the south. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. in a scene which could have been taken from a hollywood script today, a media or ripped across the sky and exploited over russia. there was a sonic blast, injuring nearly 1000 people. it is thought to be the first meteor strikes of this scale in more than a century. we have a report. >> at morning in russia, the radio on, when out of nowhere, a dancing flash across the sky. a site that few people had ever seen until now. a terrifying blaze of light as a rock hurtled towards earth. people rushed for a look. the roc was burning as it fell. it was also breaking up. explosions. the powerful shock wave shattered win
the sky and exploited over russia. there was a sonic blast, injuring nearly 1000 people. it is thought to be the first meteor strikes of this scale in more than a century. we have a report. >> at morning in russia, the radio on, when out of nowhere, a dancing flash across the sky. a site that few people had ever seen until now. a terrifying blaze of light as a rock hurtled towards earth. people rushed for a look. the roc was burning as it fell. it was also breaking up. explosions. the powerful shock wave shattered windows. local people who filmed the scenes say it was like a bomb going off. closed-circuit television reported the impact of the blast indoors. the damage caused by the extraordinary effect of the rock blowing apart. >> i saw an object moving through the sky, and then there was a flash. we assumed it was fireworks, and then it was like a rocket, with an explosion. >> the hospitals soon filled with the injured. most of them had been cut by flying glass. they had gone outside to watch and had not realized the danger. across the region, traffic cameras captured
that hit russia and left hundreds injured. an end to the holiday from hell. the crew ships docks and passengers relive the nightmare cruise. >> the worst was the toilet conditions, having to go in the gs. >> and in the ba business news. >> it is meant to be about getting countries to grow again. cutting the value of their currency to make exports cheaper. many say it is cheating. say japan is the worst offender. they will be meeting in moscow this weekend to thrash it out. london, 7:00y in in the morning in washington, 2:00 p.m. in pretoria, south africa. olympic and paralympic at least oscar pistorius, the double amputee, has appeared in court and been charged with murder. he broke down in tears as prosecutors announced they would pursue a charge of premeditated murder. his lawyers described him as being in an extremely traumatized state of mind. we have this report from our correspondent richard galpin. >> hiding his face from the cameras, oscar pistorius day is to be a police van taken to court. the global sporting legend facing a day of reckoning after his girlfriend or shot
and russia, among other things, acted as a mediator between those two factions. >> i'm sorry. and did not get the last of sentence. >> that russia, one of russia's rolls was sort of to mediate between two factions. i got the sense that priscilla buckley and burnham were sort of distant ancestors of neo conservatives and meyer, of course, being a fusion test some -- the fusion test would have disagreements. was primarily about what conservative should do about the welfare state. um wondering what russia's role was in as ideological debates. >> a very good question. i would commend something he says which is, i don't believe there was much conflict about what position to take on the welfare state, but there was some. it was not russia's primary concern. his primary concern in terms of radiology was that national review must be in the logical, that the exact positions it took would very often be secondary, but that insofar as it had certain believe some these issues, in the issues, it should be really serious about holding other conservatives and especially public office holders
to return to some islands claimed by russia around world war ii. >> hardly anybody lives here, but in japan and russia both claim these islands. the japanese call them the northern territories. flag has been debated. the soviet union control of them and under an agreement signed by japan in 1951. but tokyo wants a for your of the islands back -- wants 4 of the islands back. the country is marking northern territory day. >> we are continuing negotiations with the fundamental goal of completing a peace treaty with russia. >> although, he says he wants a peaceful resolution to the dispute, not all japanese feel the same. >> they invaded and conquered our land during the war and we were not able to fight back. it is a surge. >> the russian prime minister dmitry medvedev has visited the islands. his visit has raised tensions with tokyo in the past. northern territory day has become a fixture in the diaries of right-wingers in japan as they seek to reassert japanese influence. analysts say that abe needs all the help he can get in limiting chinese militarism despite his vows to be tough with beij
administration to have the dispute solved in a peaceful manner. prime minister abe is planning to visit russia before the end of the year to meet with the president. when he does another dispute, another issue will be on the agenda. russia control tgs islands and japan claims them. >> translator: this is an important year to build a new relationship. i hope it paves the way for abe's visit. >> mori delivered a letter from abe. putin said he, too, hoped for better things ahead. >> translator: i'm looking forward to meeting with prime minister abe. i hope it will lead to improved relations. >> mori and putin discussed a statement issued in 2001 when mori was prime minister. the statement reaffirmed the validity of the 1956 japan soviet joint declaration. the declaration states that russia will return two of the disputed islands to japan after a peace treaty is signed. officials never signed the treaty. still, mori and putin agreed they can't ignore the statement. putin says it's abnormal that the countries have no peace treaty. mori says japanese and russian leaders need to resolve the territori
>>> good morning. hundreds of people are hurt after a meteor slammed into russia this morning. the incredible video in this incredible story. >>> we are live if oakland where scientists will be checking out an asteroid buzzing close to earth this morning. we'll tell you where and when you'll be able to see it. >>> live in san francisco where a stolen car chase ends up in a five-car crash. we'll tell you why police say they had to shoot at the suspects. >>> new scandal tied to the agency in charge of state parks. there are reports of hidden cash. all ahead on ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> good morning. a day just for pam cook. friday, it's the 15th of february i'm dave clark. >> good morning, i'm pam cook. it's also very nice and sunny which is one of my favorite kind of days. >> it's a day for me too. >> it's a day for steve too. >> it is sunny and warm. we have very mild temperatures yesterday. warm for some. there is hardly any fog. if there is any it won't last long. here is sal. >>> steve, good morning. nice and clear on highway 4 as well as you come up over the hill to
, will engage russia to seek further reductions in our nuclear arsenals and continue leading the global effort to secure nuclear materials that could fall into wrong lands. >> so how many nuclear weapons does the president want to reduce? of the 1700 nuclear weapons the u.s. now possesses, the white house believes 1000 to 1100 warheads would provide an equal level of security. >> under one scenario is 1000 war leads to lower thresholds to maintain a capable nuclear deterrent. >>> if we have to blow-up more than one p planet we might need more than 1000 nuclear warheads. >> is this a reciprocal deal with russia. >> we may as well try to get something for it. >> these are strategic warheads you are talking about i don't know. >> yes. >> 1000 of these, are about 50 times the size of north korea. 1000 is fine if the russians come down and the chinese stay down to thissal level because nobody can do a first strike. >> are the russians wanting to go along? >> i think they are. these things are very expense to maintain. russia has real problems. >> where did we see that not long ago? we saw it when f
things with good returns. >> the kremlin and russia is having a big privatization program, and you, on the other hand, are buying into some of these privatizations. how does that work, sir? >> we have focused on bringing top investors with us. we brought china investment corporation to invest in several transactions. last year 1.5 billion came from investors. so our approach is invest a little bit of money, but have investors since the walls come and invest in russia so it's all about increasing the partnership of foreign investors and of private investors in the foreign economy. >> we had the ipo going on at the moment, as well. you are a stakeholder in that, as well. can you tell us what the intentions are regarding that ipo? >> well, we're big deliverers in my business. we're a shareholder. we would like to increase our stake in the business and we would like to continue bringing investors with us. we already brought quite a few investors into the company. the ipo will be happening tonight. we have big delivery of the business because it's a monopoly stock exchange in russia. pr
's government will look at russia's intent after the air space violation by russian war plane. two russian war planes briefly entered japanese air space. officials launched a protest with russian authorities. the russian defense ministry denied the claim saying there was no air space incursion. japanese officials plan to exchange data with russian counterparts and further look at what happened. the government looks at it seriously as it appeared after a a frigate's radar lock on came to light. japanese senior diplomats say they don't know russia's intention but the move doesn't seem designed to coincide with chinese activity. >>> india's defense minister has voiced his concern over china's recent acquisition of control over a strategically important port in pakistan. his remarks came a week after pakistan's announcement that it would change the management of its southwestern part of gwadar to a chinese state-run firm. the transfer is a matter of concern for india. the port was built with chinese assistance and opened in 2007. it's situated near the strait of hormuz, a key oil shipping lane fro
a leading member of russia's opposition has been placed under house arrest -- hours. a leading member of russia's opposition has been placed under house arrest. police in the philippines say they have shot and killed a man suspected of involvement in the countries political massacre. police say the suspect fired a pistol and threw a grenade at officers who were trying to arrest him. he has been linked to the deaths of more than 50 political rivals in the 2009 massacre. the killings were believed to be an intent to stop rivals from running against a candidate in the 2010 elections. a deal was made on saturday during talks between the leaders of both countries. the country except 750 asylum- seekers per year. thousands of people travel to australia by boat to seek asylum every year, often in dangerous conditions. health officials in the usa obesity obesity levels are at epidemic proportions. it is putting a strain on the health care system. the growing number of overweight americans battle high blood pressure and heart disease. rob reynolds reports from the town known as the fattest in
: today on christian world news, religious freedom in russia. why church leaders say it is getting tougher for evangelicals in the former sov union. plus, gay marriage in the u.k. a new law brings britain one step closer to making it legal for same-sex couples to tie the knot. and what happened to an orphanage in india, where kids have found a safe place, and meet the man behind it. srising religious oppression in the former soviet union. hello, i'm wendy griffith. citizens of the former soviet union face growing restrictions on their freedom. they reported that governments are closing more churches, finding and arresting their religious leaders, and destroying church literature. >> it has been a long road since the revolution that swept away atheist communism in eastern europe. today the wave of religious freedom that swept the region now seems to be receding. >> 20 years ago, when the soviet union fell apart and collapsed, when the berlin wall fell, everybody was sort of excited about all of the future possibilities. 20 years later, we're again talking about freedom. what happened? >> re
with officials of china and russia, which are permanent members of the u.n. security council. >>> south korea's incoming president says she may have to decide,deal with it as part of her administration. she made it part of her platform in how to build relations and trust with the north. >> translator: north korean actions affect our policy. the north should understand with any further pro provocation, we will be able to have a dialogue, even if we want to. >> park made the remark on wednesday at a meeting of transition committee panel on foreign affairs in north/south relation. she said the north's nuclear test on tuesday clearly shows the difficulty of building trust and peace on the korean peninsula. she indicated that for the time being, she will focus on preventing such provocation to avoid anxiety spreading among the south korean people. >>> south korean military personnel are trying to determine the type of bomb used for their test. they have taken to the sea and the sky to search for radioactive substances. a defense ministry spokesperson says the samples could help determine the makeu
sales in russia lead to a worse than expected fourth quarter in russia. >>> natixis shares up near 20%. unveiling a simpler structure on a special dividend. >>> and the final week of campaigni campaigning in italy with polls suggesting bersani has the lead. >> announcer: you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >> okay. first thing to say is we have three hours of the good stuff today. >> yes, we do. for all the americans on holiday today, we know you wouldn't want to miss a single second of it the the.we have so much going on. we're going to hear from wayne swan, sir phillip green, we're going to hear tr -- >> you are out of the fashion week, right sfp. >> yeah. i really enjoy getting the perspective from designers because what they say about where they're seeing strength tr around the world and frankly when you ask them and they say we're investing in digital that's as important if not more than what's happening in the retail world. >> did you see some great things? >> there are some pretty things there, as well. what was interesting is
into russia. more than 1,000 people reported hurt by the flying glass. the collapsing buildings. look at the images. li listen to the sound. we'll take you there. >>> now, also, since the 4,000 people are off that disgusting cruise ship, what happens to the ship now. >>> and that olympic athlete, oscar pistorius, accused of murdering his girlfriend in his own home, collapses and sobs in court. we have a lot of news happening on the ground. but the big shock and awe, falling from the sky is leading it all. i'm talking quite literally here. while you were sleeping this unbelievable scene was unfolding in southern russia. close encounters of the third kind. wow. raining down near the euro mountains, that is a meteor breaking up over the earth's atmosphere. it's like a crazy scene from a movie but it's real. make no mistake, the scenes and the light coming from a meteor as it streaks across the side. the blinding flash. the deafening explosion. caught on tape. up 1,000 people were hurt because of this meteor. nearly 300 buildings were reported damaged including this factory that you're se
, in talking about another country, russia. you know, russia desperately wants to reproduce itself to the rest of the world. and not in some of the main it has been. they get this opportunity with the g20 coming up in september. crystal ball, do you see anything from a coordination standpoint from the g20, and -- having out of this? this? and easy russia's image change? >> i think this is a big opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen in russia. we will just have to see. because they're sitting on all these oil reserves. we know where the price of oil is. but there as you know there's a lot of problems. and so we have to see whether communist, russia can show that it's taking some of these reforms it needs to take. and we will see. and this is a perfect opportunity to do so. so far i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did any thing positive was the one in london. and i give credit to gordon brown. that was his greatest moment i think at that particular time. do it. no, i mean come effect very organized meetings. i was in korea. there was no one who can organ
to our friends in russia and china, the two members, to put the necessary leverage on the assad dictator in syria to leave and let people go to their new democratic government. >> thank you very much. >> my colleagues speaking to the turkish minister. that is almost the end of the program. just a reminder, you can find lots more material from the program on line, with interviews, analysis. visits the website. that is it for us this week. from all of us, good night. >> makes sense of international news. it >> funding for this presentation is made possible by -- the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping for having new ventures and to provide key, strategic decisions. we offered taylor and solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you -- for you? -- for you?
putting their money currently. but to russia with love, currency wars coming to moscow as g-20 leaders meet there. did liesman go? if so, it's a big home coming. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew ross sorkin is off today. our guest host this morning is sir martin sorrell. our top story, nightmare at sea. more than 4,000 passengers on the disabled carnival cruise cry oomph docked late last night. michelle caruso cabrera is there on scene. she's going to join us with more and what the means for carnival and the broader cruise industry overall. >>> we are tracking the markets this morning. a lot of excitement fueled in large part by deal activities. in the last few days aloep, we heard berkshire hathway is buying heinz for $3 billion. and comcast announcing a $16.7 deal to buy out ge's remaining stake in cnbc parent nbc universal. warn buffett on "squawk box" yesterday. >> i'm ready for on the another element. please, if you see any walking by, please call me. >> how much do you h
in october. >> rest of vessels that added to the number of dead and a blast at a coal mine in northern russia. officials say 18 people died and 10 bodies have been recovered. there are 23 men and a mine at the time. the glass is blamed on a buildup of methane. deadly acts as a coal miner freak in russia because of negligence and lax safety regulations. we're looking for high of 59 and sunshine all around for everyone. we will be right back. >> the vatican is confirming that the vaticatold is resignin. he will officially step down on february 28th because he says he is too infirm to continue his pappas see. pope benedictus the first pontiff to resign in nearly 600 years. this morning of 30's are doing using surveillance video and bottles to track down and x cop accused of three murders. it shows fugitive christopher doors truck and a man of who appears to be dorner throwing items into a dumpster. authorities are offering a $1 million reward for information read leading to the rest of dorner. san mateo police are investigating a recent string of burglaries into neighborhoods that investigators
members that include the united states, china, it includes russia. russia is really neither an economic or military superpower except in regards to its nuclear arsenal. and then we have friends and britain and here we have two very much medium powers that are not economic heavyweights, you still exert a great deal of forward and influence in world affairs. a large part of that as leverage they security council itself. we have no india, no brazil, no party from outside this kind of frozen group. and this is, i think, an enormous problem for the security council and one that there's probably no structural way to overcome. the reason why is pretty simple. if you say to any of the current members, why did she set on down, france and britain come you guys had to combine in a single european union fee. and then there's a lot of hemming and hauling it in the meantime, germany pops up and says pet, we are actually one of the world's great economic superpowers. we have no military to speak of and we cannot do anything, but we pay for everything, so we actually deserve a seat. she say we know how
in those components on that part. you know, just as an aside, in talking about another country, russia, you know, russia desperately wants to reintroduce its self to the rest of the world. and not in some of the way that it has been. they have this opportunity with a g20 coming of in september. crystal ball. do you see anything from a coordinations standpoint from veggie 20 coming out of this? you see russia's image changing? >> well, i think this is a bigger opportunity for the prime minister to show what could happen. we will just have to see. they're sitting and these are reserves. we know where the price of oil is, but there are a lot of problems. and so we have tessie weather, you know, russia can show that it is taking some of these reforms it needs to take. we will see, and this is a perfect opporunity to do so. so far, i think, as i said, the only g20 meeting that really did anything positive was the one in london, and i give credit to gordon brown, that was his greatest moment, i think, at that particular time. the i mean, you have had very well organized meetings. i was in korea.
bank is kick off officially those weekend squawk in russia. they're expected to deliver a pledge of monetary policy while focusing on measures to boost global growth. steve has been there all week and he joins us again this morning. steve, we actually finally start the meetings today. we've had comments out from the russian finance minister, as well. what's he saying? >> well, he's trying to get us back on track on to a growth agenda, which when you look back at what the agenda was a couple of meetings ago back in toronto in 2010, that was sorely missing. that was about harboring deficits and having firm targets. it hasn't really worked, has it? what they've said is our growth estimates were slightly optimistic. listening to what some of the policymakers are saying this time around, the likes of mario draghi, i'm scratching my head a little bit. there's some uncontentious stuff. i can live with that. range of financial market indicators showing situation normalizing. but what about this bit? currency chatter is inappropriate, fruitless and self-defeating. hang on a second, mr. dr
to monetize the russia angle going forward? >> tnk has been a successful venture for ten years and it's a joint venture that has run its course. russia is so important for the oil and gas industry. we've worked there for many years and made big differences in terms of russian oil and gas production. .i think we've taken what had been a bit of a problem and turned it into an opportunity and i'm very much looking forward to working with ross net. >> how are you going to monitor the opportunity in that respect? >> it has great potential. it's the largest oil producing country in the world. we'll own just under 20% of the shares. we'll have roles on the board, but i see a long cooperation potentially between bp and ross net and opportunities inside and outside of russia. plus i think we can help with many of its assets. i'm excited about it. >> now back to the earnings. around the increase in the dividend this year, is that the message then to shareholders, growing confidence? >> yes. bp has been through a bit of a long wave length transition here from 2010. we sure that our shareholders
russia. a small low here, weakening, just a little drizzle of snow heading out towards the east. and that will be winning down. it will stay very unsettled for southern locations. one system coming through the balkans will bring snow to the upper elevations and heavy rain that could result in flash flooding. the next round of moisture from the atlantic to the iberian peninsula. temperatures, minus 4 in stockholm. zero in kiev. a 14 in athens, not too bad here and 16 in lisbon. here's your extended forecast. >>> a horse from michigan has gone viral on the internet after a video showed she is an expert escape artist. 9-year-old mare, mariska, taught herself how to open the latch on her stall and be set free. she can open the stalls of the other horses and even open the refrigerator to get a snack. she has attracted 800,000 views since being posted last month. >> we believe that mariska's motivation to opening the latch and doing her houdini trick, she basically thinks with her stomach. she had a snack in the grain room, then the motivation is to get outside to the grass. >> it loo
their oscars. a new round of nuclear talks get therway between iran and u.s., uk, russia, china, france, and germany. american officials are attending the talks in context on -- inc. akhstan.nded -- in kaz talks likean wants this to put it on the world stage. it wants to be seen as having a lead role, especially when it comes to the control of nuclear weapons. after the collapse of the soviet gave up itshstan nuclear weapons. it wants to play the role of honest broker. it will be hard to make progress. in recent years, there have been several rounds of negotiations. little progress was made. each side comes to the table with strong demands. this group wants more access to nuclear sites for inspection. to uraniumran enrichment at five -- 5%. it is currently up to 20%. they want it to limit stockpiles of enriched uranium. iran wants the west to recognize its right of enrichment and to start to dithch the sanctions. the talks are sure to be difficult. the international community says it is bringing offers which are serious and substantial. upcoming elections to worry about. these negotiati
. >> scientists found the biggest fragment of a meteorite that exploded with the force of an atomic bomb in russia. it weighs almost 2 kilos and one of more than 100 bits found so far. it injured around 1500 people and damaged thousands of homes in siberia earlier this month. proof that good things come in small packages. an indian rocket put seven canadian satellites into orbit. they include two of the world's smallest telescopes. more from toronto. >> when you think of space science, you usually think big. the canadian satellites aboard aloft by this indian rocket are tiny, just 27 centimeters across, weighing less than 7 kilos each. >> we have done this before. >> back on earth, two more of the tube shape devices are getting ready for herb at the university of toronto's institute for aerospace studies. a total of six have been designed here. their task is formidable. but the manager telescopes' pointed deep into space, the satellite, data on cosmic explosions and primordial matter. >> the astronomy's -- astronomers are interested in spending big, massive stars. they tend to lead it brief and vi
. >> an unusual trial is scheduled to begin in russia soon. it involves a defendant who is dead. accused russian tax authorities of stealing $200 million. but when he reported this to police, they arrested him for tax evasion. he was found dead in his cell a year later. the government of oratory outside chicago, the u.s. investing millions of dollars into a new center designed to improve batteries that power iphones to from eye phon electric cars. they've made a breakthrough in green technology that could turn a trash to cash. >> from a grocery store to garbage dump, there is a global glut of plastic bags. 100 billion are discarded each year in the u.s. alone, just 13 percent are recycled and the rustling on lawns and in landfills for centuries. craig reddix hundreds of years to degrade. >> they want to end all that. the scientists at this laboratory have found a way to turn the bags into batteries. >> there are many benefits. a very important product. >> in the past, this were not able to mix different kinds of plastics, and he found a way around that. the cuts the bags up and stuffed them into
where -- sochi itself. >> let's use the c word. it always comes up in russia. are you saying part of this is about corruption, the spiraling costs? >> it is about corruption. >> thanks very much. stay with us on "bbc world news ." still to come -- i will be speaking to a cycling journalist about the fallout from today's damming report -- daminning report on doping in australian sports. now to a question worth just under one trillion euros, how much money should the european union spend over the next six years? eu leaders are trying to reach a compromise deal on their next budget, but the talks will not be easy at a time of economic austerity. >> how much should a cost to run the european union? that is the question facing -- should it cost to run the european union? that is the question facing leaders today. they want bigger funding to pay for infrastructure projects like this. the french want eu grants to their farmers to be kept high. the countries in the south are struggling with that. they cannot afford any cut in revenue from the eu -- with deb t. they cannot afford any cut i
largest [indiscernible] profits have stalled in their key markets of russia and eastern europe. they say they are now focusing on asia to exhaust their opportunities. like much of the world, the british high street has suffered from huge casualties lately. but now a supermarket chain is hoping to find some success. they have purchased 49 shops from the failed film rental chain, blockbuster, which they will transform and convenience stores. the new franchise is expected to create new jobs. for the moment the managing director describe what was behind the change. >> the convenience sector, 20 pence on every pound in the u.k. is spent in convenience stores. customers tell us that those convenience stores do not give them fresh products or prices. we thought we could bring morris into a convenience store, offering great and fresh products at great prices. they consider the opportunity to go to high streets and bring back some bustle. >> the japanese yen has continued its slide against the u.s. dollar today. they were not following a lack of restraint against the japanese authorities. it was
states. the two the started it, united states and russia, have the largest arsenal. everyone has dozens. the united states and russia have 95% of the weapons. then you get united kingdom, france, china, india, pakistan, each with somewhere between 100 and 200 nuclear-weapons. north korea has a couple of weapons, maybe somewhere between six and 12. every time the test the use up some of their plutonium. the negotiated agreement in the 1990's with the nine states. host: what is the infrastructure that is needed to be a real threat? guest: that is a very quick -- a very good question. north korea cannot deliver this weapon. it is probably too bulky to put on a plane or missile. there is not much they can do with it. baby fat exit. but that is about it. most countries get a clear weapons and that is to stop other countries to stop from attacking them. it is one of the reasons nuclear-weapons have not been used in 60 years, despite the united states being in major wars. no one has used a nuclear weapon and that is because it not have much military value. you are seeing this change, particula
't agree. the management of their own area. so russia, eastern europe, china, asia. i think people fail to think through what the implications are, and i wonder if you could just play that out for a moment. because our asian allies have not failed to think this through. >> absolutely. and, briefly, i think there's two problems with offshore balancing. one is the political, and one is the practical. everything you said is absolutely right, and i think that sort of falls in the phase zero period of political. you have to have skip in the game. i know it's a cliche, but if you're not there present, then the asians question extraordinarily why you're going to come in when the stakes get much higher. and they don't even need to think out to the existential question of, you know, soviet -- soviet, chinese icbms -- hoping for the good old days when things were much clearer. [laughter] does the nuclear umbrella still hold. for them the credibility is your daily presence, and as you point out, we've already been doing offshore balancing even while being present because we've had the filipinos ou
china and korea and russia, and these countries have done more to promote domestic options for these children and have done more to reduce the number of children they are placing outside their own countries dramatically. china in 2005 placed 14,000 children in u.s. families, and last year, it was a little over 2000. there's also been pressure on countries to look at their own systems to make sure they are avoiding any forms of corruption. oftentimes when countries do that, they completely suspend international adoption programs, and the result is children stay in foster care or institutions. host: i believe that is the case particularly regarding russian adoptions. the headline from the "national journal" -- talk to us about what the situation is and how we got to where we are. guest: there was a piece of legislation passed by congress, and there was a provision addressing human rights issues in russia, and the russian people felt like it was a slap in the face. they chose to respond by passing a ban on adoption by american families. two things are a sad about this -- that
, considering the region. china on one side, india the south, russia to the north. united states can't just pack up and walk away. but are we able to convince the people there, our local hosts and potential allies, that we need to be there? that is the question. and that is where i believe there has been a failure. >> host: but we are -- our footprint is going to be much smaller after 2014. >> guest: that's a choice we're making and i'm not entirely happy. i would like a different kind of footprint. if you had conditionals like the one i went to, which is a university now, and they open -- if you had ten of these, throughout the tribal areas, think of the impact. think of the future generation, in one stroke you're changing the direction of a nation. if we value education, knowledge, law, a compassionate civil society, we must understand, peter so do the irans and pakistanis. we must try to convey this to them. not to suggest that soldiers and guns and missiles and drones because that will immediately have locals resisting. so the paradigm has to be thought out and that can only be thought out i
to sleep. >> we haven't confirmed this, but a lot of video out of russia last night. this is crazy stuff. morgan freeman "deep impact" type stuff. 400 people injured. nutso stuff out of russia. we have enough to worry about, don't we, everyone? great show, everyone. tgif. "morning joe" starts right now. ♪ rock the boat ♪ don't tip the boat over ♪ rock the boat ♪ don't rock the boat baby >> united states ain't nothing better. >> we didn't have water. we didn't have showers. we didn't have hot meals. >> it was literally like being in a floating port-a-potty. just human waste everywhere. >> they had a sign outside their cabin saying "need medication." basically they ran out of their medication and their basic needs. >> the crew on the boat, unbelievable. those guys had worse conditions than we did, and they were serving us. >> what's the first thing you're going to do? >> chick-fil-a, i think. >> all right. good morning. it is friday and one hell of a good friday for those thousands of passengers who are now back on land and off that cruise ship. it's february 15th. welcome to "morn
. when immigrants left the steppes of russia there with note delta flight, virgin air flight to see mom the next year. you were betting your last dollar that you might be able to get away from the oppressive left and reestablish your life in his new land. as you enter the harbor terrific moment, you had your first look at the new land and the fog is there, maybe the fog will clear and you will see the statue of liberty and those immigrants would see that, go by the statue of liberty and they would not know the pedestal being built with pennies and nickels, then they would turn and have the first look at the new york city skyline, the city that would welcome them, where they learn their english, where they get their first foothold on the american economic life and if the sun was right you be leaning off of the gold dome of the world building, not a monument to congress or banking or manufacturing or agriculture but a monument to the american press, the only constitutionally explicitly constitutionally protected business in the united states by the first amendment, doesn't say you have th
the statement this week. it comes this week after the g-20 meeting this russia where the group is expected to -- from market determined exchange rat about growing rhetoric about currency wars. ross, it's kind of extraordinary when you're in a situation where they're talking about the need for emphasizing the need for market-based currencies. >> yeah, exactly. currencies were also discussed last night. the officials at the g-20 summit at the end of the week is a more appropriate place to discuss currency moves. >> silvia wadhwa is in brussels and she recently caught up with the french finance minister and began by asking him about just how concerned he is about the strength of the euro. >> in a strong euro to a dead euro. six months to go, the question is is the euro going to survive? the euro is going to survive. if people today buy the euro, it's because the euro gains confidence from the people. but at the same time, it's not a good news if we are not able to answer the aggressive attitudes on the parts of the world. we must fight the currencies. we must enter into currency wars. but at
like russia and india who are playing a very interesting role in the evolving diplomacy over iran. so, tom, welcome. >> thank you, tamara. and along with tom, of course, we have our own kenneth pollack, senior fellow in the saban center, and ken is finishing a book right now on the challenge of iran which you will be able to look for in bookstores later this year. so we're very happy to have ken with us to provide some comments on this topic as well. what we'll do is have a little bit of a conversation up here, and then we'll open it up for questions from the floor, and why don't we jump right in with, with some of these recent developments. there's now a date set for the next round of international negotiations to be held inial matty, that distinguished diplomatic capital. one wonders if perhaps that quieter location will allow a little bit of distance from the glare of the cameras. do you expect much progress? what do you expect from these long-delayed, long-awaited talks? >> thanks, tamara, very much. it's a pleasure to be with you all. i can't think of a more wonderful crowd to br
excuse russia uses to continue supporting syria. the situations and regimes are very different, but the blind these governments are using to continue supporting the regime that commits human-rights abuses are the same lines. i think it is unfortunate because the u.s. in the short term and may seem like it strategic, but in the long term it is not sustainable. if anything, they're raising anti-to listen to it in a very fast way. losing a big credibility. >> on the security issue, the saudi monarchy as well as others are arguing against pressure against thebi government, alleging much of the popular unrest is being filled by iran seeking to stir up the shia population bahrain. your response to these allegations of iranian or iran being behind the uprising there? >> first of all, it is not very difficult to understand the situation in bahrain. the government's report brought about by the king accepted by the king, the commission of inquiry found no bahraini influence. but beyond that, the civil- rights movement started in the 1920's, long before the security issues of iran. at a t
finance minister of russia earlier on. he was like, well, why now, we thought they were going to make the statement, they were going to make it? n russia as part of the talks. there's a mass confusion within the g-7 about what they were trying to achieve. maybe the markets got it right. actually that everybody is concerned about the competitiveness. at the moment the russians especially is been actually losing out in these currency wars so to speak since july. have been rallying the ruble against the dollar, rallying again the yen heavily, as well. they're as concerned as anyone about the competitive advantage from the devaluation of these currencies, as well, gained by the japanese and others. face it, as jim o'neil points out in one commentary, the americans have been doing this for 30 years. it's rich to turn around and say anyone can't do. it mr. carney, currently of the bank of canada, soon to be bank of england, said we need forceful representation at the g-20 to solve issues. what's interesting is not to lose track of some of the more important agenda issues from the russians,
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